2019. InDesign.

8.5” x 11” 24 pages plus front matter and cover. Deliverables included print-ready perfect bound soft-cover pamphlet and pdf file.

This was requested by Susan Rosenberg Jones, a photographer, for “Widow/er” a show of her photographs at the Griffin Museum of Photography, that opened on October 24, 2019. The show includes a selection of photographs from a larger body of work that includes both photographs as well as personal statements of varying lengths by her subjects. To round out the experience of visitors to the show, Susan asked me to create a pamphlet that would include all the photographs and the full statements as a companion for this and future shows.

The project was straightforward. I was constrained to keep the pamphlet size at 30 pages (hence the paper models in the gallery below).

The other challenge was to keep the style of the text in line with the wall captions that were already printed. The font used for the wall captions was Times New Roman, but as I started laying out the personal statements, Times New Roman ended up being hard to read. I found a softer, rounder and easier to read serif font for the pamphlet and cover that looked enough like Times New Roman not to detract from the wall captions.

Susan left the initial cover design up to me. I worked up a few versions of the cover and in the process hit on the white and light grey color scheme to tie the whole pamphlet together. As I’d been looking at the photographs and reading the statements, I was left with a sense that the collection of photographs was both about the people left behind as well as those who died. The contrasting color was a way to bring a visual representation of the two people who make up the widow/er experience. Susan liked this color scheme and after a few back and forth sessions on the cover, I designed a cover she really liked.

This project culminated in uploading the InDesign file to an online self-publishing business and helping Susan navigate the site and set up her initial order of 60 copies.

After the opening, the Griffin Museum asked for more copies of the pamphlet to sell.